fastcompany:

Some of the biggest innovations of our time were created after hours. Here, the compelling case for trying out stupid things on the side.

“The only way a side project will work is if people give themselves permission to think simple, to change their minds, to fail—basically, to not take them too seriously,” says van Schneider. “When you treat something like it’s stupid, you have fun with it, you don’t put too much structure around it. You can enjoy different types of success.”

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good:

"Work for something because it is good, not just because it has a change to succeed." -Václav Havel

fastcompany:

Some may be obvious, like watching out for typos and misspelled words, but others—like cookie-cutter copies or file names—might be more sneaky mistakes you’re making when looking for a job. 

Excellence must be pursued, it must be wooed with all of one’s might and every bit of effort that we have; each day there’s a new encounter, each week is a new challenge. All of the noise and all of the glamour, all of the color all of the excitement, all of the rings and all of the money. These are the things that linger only in the memory. But the spirit, the will to excel, the will to win, these are the things that endure.
Vince Lombardi

fastcompany:

An inventor behind a bionic glove for amputees. A kid who has a real idea to cure cancer. Not everyone should skip college, but for these teenagers, it could be to everyone’s benefit if they jump right into working on their passions.

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fastcompany:

It sounds creepy, but it also sounds supremely useful.

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fastcompany:

What’s life really like designing for Apple? An alum shares what he learned during his seven years in Cupertino.

Apple is synonymous with upper echelon design, but very little is known about the company’s design process. Most of Apple’s own employees aren’t allowed inside Apple’s fabled design studios. So we’re left piecing together interviews, or outright speculating about how Apple does it and what it’s really like to be a designer at the company.

Enter Mark Kawano. Before founding Storehouse, Kawano was a senior designer at Apple for seven years, where he worked on Aperture and iPhoto. Later, Kawano became Apple’s User Experience Evangelist, guiding third-party app iOS developers to create software that felt right on Apple’s platforms. Kawano was with the company during a critical moment, as Apple released the iPhone and created the wide world of apps.

In an interview with Co.Design (fastcodesign), Kawano spoke frankly about his time at Apple—and especially wanted to address all the myths the industry has about the company and about its people.

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Being an entrepreneur, you have to be optimistic, because if you knew all of the obstacles you would face, you would never start anything.
Ray Kurzweil