fastcompany:

Have you ever received an amazing email, one that you’d like to print out and pin to your wall, one that made you grin from ear to ear or slow-clap in appreciation and reverence?

When I come across these gems, I drop them into a “Snippets” folder. I study them, I swoon over them, and I borrow bits and pieces of them to send better email.

Now imagine that every email you send is as great as these occasional all-stars you receive.

Impossible? Not at all.

Worth shooting for? Definitely.

Read More>

fastcompany:

You probably know someone who’s always a step ahead of the game. She can tell, somehow innately, when bad news is coming, or when to take the risk that no one else would touch.

These people are dialed into their “gut instincts,” and are never wrong—almost annoyingly so.

The International Association of Administrative Professionals and OfficeTeam surveyed 3,500 administrative professionals and 1,300 senior managers, and found that 88% make decisions based on gut feelings.

The ability to intuit future problems before they become serious can be an invaluable trait in the workplace. “Any manager will tell you that having an assistant who anticipates his or her needs and offers solutions without being asked is virtually indispensable,” says Robert Hosking, OfficeTeam executive director.

There are five types of intuition:

Read More>

fastcompany:

Networking in a new industry can be daunting for even the most socially adept. Here’s how to dissolve the nerves.

Networking is research-proven to be the overwhelmingly best way to land a job, better than job board hunting and recruiter services.

But for most of us—introverts, especially—selling oneself as a “brand” doesn’t come naturally. Something as small as fully owning the skills section of your resume feels like pulling your own teeth; shoving yourself out the door to walk into a room of strangers feels like a root canal.

Here’s how to calm the nerves and awkwardness that come with wading into a crowd of industry pros, in search of your next big break:

Read More>

fastcompany:

Some of the biggest innovations of our time were created after hours. Here, the compelling case for trying out stupid things on the side.

“The only way a side project will work is if people give themselves permission to think simple, to change their minds, to fail—basically, to not take them too seriously,” says van Schneider. “When you treat something like it’s stupid, you have fun with it, you don’t put too much structure around it. You can enjoy different types of success.”

Read More>

good:

"Work for something because it is good, not just because it has a change to succeed." -Václav Havel

fastcompany:

Some may be obvious, like watching out for typos and misspelled words, but others—like cookie-cutter copies or file names—might be more sneaky mistakes you’re making when looking for a job. 

Excellence must be pursued, it must be wooed with all of one’s might and every bit of effort that we have; each day there’s a new encounter, each week is a new challenge. All of the noise and all of the glamour, all of the color all of the excitement, all of the rings and all of the money. These are the things that linger only in the memory. But the spirit, the will to excel, the will to win, these are the things that endure.
Vince Lombardi

fastcompany:

An inventor behind a bionic glove for amputees. A kid who has a real idea to cure cancer. Not everyone should skip college, but for these teenagers, it could be to everyone’s benefit if they jump right into working on their passions.

Read More>